Google Data Scientist Algorithmic Coding Interview




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Today I’m joined by Sergey who is a data scientist consultant and former programming competition winner.
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Sergey has worked at a variety of places such as a quant on wall street to a startup that got acquired by Grubhub. He joins me today in solving a very tough algorithms problem asked by Google. If you’re looking to learn programming from him, check out Interview Query coaching!

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Comment List

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    Wow, Sergey is an intense thinker and this video is quite a pleasure to watch an expert problem solver in action!

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    The smaller problem would be for just one dimension. Assume 9 points at index 0 and one point at index 50. The centre of mass is at 5, but the real answer is to choose final location at index zero. Because every index move away from that, the 9 people have to move away and one person from the index 50 has to travel less. After playing with few more examples, I realized we need to think of geometric median. And ANY point between the two middle ones would be an optimal place. As example, consider below:
    1,2,3,5,19,20

    The solution above would be any point between 3 and 5, inclusive. If we choose 3, total distance is: 2+1+0+2+16+17 which would be same as if we chose 5 as host: 4+3+2+0+14+15. Hence the median. Any point between 3 and 5 would also suffice.

    Coming to two dimensions, or more – I couldn't think of a rigorous proof if this would work – but had an idea of doing PCA for the three dimensions, to reduce to one dimension and then do this geometric median. Kindly let me know any thoughts on this approach.

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    When you asked him to make it faster were you actually looking for a numerical method for speed or to make the code run faster algorithmically. The simplest speed up I can see is to store already computed distances for the pairs so you dont have to recompute. Might get a tiny bit tricky to do this in the best way possible but that seems like a solid way forward to me

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    this code gets it done in 2n:

    friends = [{'name':'bob', 'location':(5,2,10)},

    {'name':'david', 'location':(2,3,5)},

    {'name':'mary', 'location':(19,3,4)},

    {'name':'skyler', 'location':(3,5,1)}]

    means = [0,0,0]

    for host in friends:

    means[0] += host.get('location')[0]/len(friends)

    means[1] += host.get('location')[1]/len(friends)

    means[2] += host.get('location')[2]/len(friends)

    best_host_index = None

    best_host_sum = 9999999

    for idx,host in enumerate(friends):

    temp_sum = abs(host.get('location')[0]-means[0]) + abs(host.get('location')[1]-means[1]) + abs(host.get('location')[2]-means[2])

    if temp_sum < best_host_sum:

    best_host_sum = temp_sum

    best_host_index = idx

    print(friends[best_host_index])

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    I'm so happy that expert programmers also need a million goes to get something to run

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    If you have a million points, you can randomly sample 10000 to approximate a solution. If you do it a couple of times, you may get an idea of how stable solutions are (=how close they are to each other). That validates your answer.

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    Incredible! Very helpful to see the mindset and walkthrough – would be awesome to see more of these with a "feedback" of solution as well

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    Shouldn't this output 0 in cases where we are computing costs with the same point? and in such case 0 would be the best cost? We have not taken into consideration to not calculate cost for points with itself.

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    Can we not find the center of the group of friends by taking the average for x, y and z coordinates, and then find the closest friend to that center? One linear scan for computing average coordinates, one more linear scan to compare all points to average, so O(n) time. O(1) space also.

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    What resources would you suggest to prepare for coding interview with python?

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    Good vids. About to check out some more of your videos. By the way, go and search for smzeus . c o m!!! It will help you promote your videos.

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    what about a solution using the centroid?

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    Great video

  • Data Science Jay
    December 21, 2020

    This is great, thanks Jay!

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