Machine Learning for Fluid Mechanics




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@eigensteve on Twitter

This video gives an overview of how Machine Learning is being used in Fluid Mechanics. In fact, fluid mechanics is one of the original “big data” sciences, and many advances in ML came out of fluids.

Read the paper: https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-fluid-010719-060214
Free Arxiv paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1905.11075

Lab website: www.eigensteve.com

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Comment List

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Sounds promising but, Is it really possible to construct generalized models for wide range of fluid flows? given that the physics of fluids is very complicated unlike other fields where ML is being applied. But ML can definitely help us observe some generalized patterns in the fluids (like Kolmogrove's 5/3rd law) that we previously didn't saw or know about. ML algorithms can also help us quickly build custom turbulence models for specific flows that we are interested to learn about with a benefit of lower simulation times. But we need a lot of data.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Steve, can you tell me what is the system you are using to do your presentation where it looks like you are writing on a transparent board on the other side of the board but we can see it the right way? It looks so cool.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Fantastic video!

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Yeah you get a result but any fluid dynamic person would say that's useless. Generating pictures with ML is great but for engineering you have to rely on the results

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Can machine learning can used for solid mechanics… Please make a video in this topic also

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Simply amazing! Can't wait to watch more!

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thanks so much for making these videos available to the public! I'm currently going through your "Data-Driven Science and Engineering" book in group meetings at UC Berkeley, and these videos are a great additional resource

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thank you Steve, if you could please elaborate on this and show us some practical examples/applications that we can do using python/matlab it would be great.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    So nice explanation. I can't help myself subscribing your channel!

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020
  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thanks a lot for the nice lecture, really appreciate it. Could you please let me know how can we try to solve parabolic PDEs or try to predict if the system can show the Turing patterns or not? Could you please let me know from where can I start to know how to solve PDEs in ML? I have so many questions that it is embarrassing for me to type all of them.
    Once again, love your lectures.
    Thank you.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Idea – If you define differential equations as loop functions. Ex. y[0] = …; loop (dydt = y ; y: = y +dydt*dt) then we there should exist loop(loop(loop(…))) functions since that belongs to xyz space. Three loops to initialize a 3D volume.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thanks for this Steve. Please upload more videos like this..https://youtu.be/v1vmWS6Y16A

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Wow. At about 15 minutes that noise and "corrupted pixels" in the images produces noise in the transcoding and YouTube compression algorithm. Crazy.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thank you so much, Steve!

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Greeeat!! I read this year's Raissi and Karniadakis' paper in Science and I definitely want to know more

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Love to see you standing in Earthrise lmao, looked slick

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thanks for the great video. It's very fascinating to hear neural nets constrained by physics principles. How much of background knowledge of fluid mechanics is needed to get started with this kind of problems? (if the current background is computer science and machine learning)

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thanks Steve

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Fantastic overview, watched your video because I was getting stuck in my model I might change direction.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Dear Steve Brunton, Thanks for the great lecture. Any suggestions on datasets to train these flow models

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thank you for the detailed and informative video. Easily saved me from weeks of literature survey effort by providing a review of selected papers across various ML + CFD applications. All the papers mentioned seem like great starting points to delve into the field.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    got this recommended after watching your Von Karman and IPAM lectures 🙂
    great stuff !

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    4:38 proof: Business people are clueless and/or <insert your own adjective>. Then there are those that move from tech roles to business. It is required of them to become clueless, bordering on stupid, to progress further. Rant from a burnt employee 🙂

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Steve I can't follow half of what you are saying… but I LOVE these videos!!!

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    This was much needed thank you 😀

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Inspiring speech of a trending field of computational engineering.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Really Enjoyed this video! Thank you

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Great work. What is your opinion about the Material Point Method(MPM) to model high-level behavior of fluid dynamics? Ppl are modeling fluid motion behavior using this method in recent papers.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    This is an excellent introduction, thank you very much, I found it tremendously helpful.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Cheers from an EE grad student, there was a great survey paper published recently about AI in power electronics if you're interested in looking at where ML is going in for electronics!
    An Overview of Artificial Intelligence Applications for Power Electronics (2020)

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    This is such a great video of top view of ML in FM. Loved it!

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    if you jump in to M Faraday 2848 (I have a numbered great book of the Weston world university of Chicago press 1950s something )and keep reading you may fined some interesting thoughts and data its about the atmosphere magnetic relaxation of bonds with heat 1850 and boundary layers and on reading Galileo it may well have been navigators who uncovered that which is credited to the I Newton you ,know
    its true ,what they said abut putting monkiys and type writers together

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    This is really interesting and worth investigating.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Yes you are right nice toy. 🤣🤣🤣 Your genius breaks me.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    You are a great inspiration. It's absolute pleasure of watching your lectures and learning.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Thanks this is a very inspiring video.
    Could ML for Fluid Mechanics be used to train neonatal artificial respiration systems for best parameterization of air flow intensity with respect to the very small sensible patients lungs – to avoid too strong air flow caused by inaccurate manually parametrization ?
    I learned that manually parametrizion seems to quit difficult with the risk to be not exactly enough so that early born babies lungs have much higher risk to be negative effected by artificial respiration.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    *raises. RAISES the question! Begging the question is akin to tautology in logic.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    You are just great!
    Kindly share more videos on this topic

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Great video
    God help and guide you

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    This is an outstanding lecture.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    I love this video! I will check out the papers. Thanks

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    This is a great talk. I really enjoyed your calm and concise way of explaining this hugely complex topic.

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    Great job as always Steve! 🙂

  • Steve Brunton
    November 19, 2020

    I am loving this channel

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