Machine Learning: Living in the Age of AI | A WIRED Film




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“Machine Learning: Living in the Age of AI,” examines the extraordinary ways in which people are interacting with AI today. Hobbyists and teenagers are now developing tech powered by machine learning and WIRED shows the impacts of AI on schoolchildren and farmers and senior citizens, as well as looking at the implications that rapidly accelerating technology can have. The film was directed by filmmaker Chris Cannucciari, produced by WIRED, and supported by McCann Worldgroup.

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Machine Learning: Living in the Age of AI | A WIRED Film

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Comment List

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    One of the narrators knows nothing about Tesla. Can’t believe that ,

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Airplanes as we now know them will no longer exist in 10 years.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    For growing AI will bring us back to caring for our soil and to stop using GM seeds and artificial fertilizers .and pesticides.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Tesla seems so far advanced than your subject car that uses Lydar.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    neural net is just a complete bipartitive graph, nothing more

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    AI evens the platform between intelligent and less intelligent people, extinguishing human exploitation and leveling the field between the "haves" and the "have nots".

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    When I was little we were memorizing multiplication and division tables. These kids are learning about neural networks.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    pretty good documentary, BUT people mistake AI as actual intelligence: it's not! They haven't figured our how the brain has pre-knowledge before experience, so they try to pre-program complex algorithms into AI to anticipate things. For a good theory of how the brain actually acquires pre-knowledge, youtube search "Immanuel's Law" and see this guy theory about how the brain adapts its EM waves to normalize quantum indeterminacy to perceive the real world. Somehow, according to this guy, this process gains us judgment. AI doesn't have judgment, so we should treat it as though it does.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    It is interesting how high profile managers, CEOs, big corporation figures and similar people (and of course technically educated people owned by before mentioned people) are the only ones enthusiastic about AI.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Because there is NO SUCH THING as oversight over this tech., things like the deepfake tech will cause major problems in the world. Since there are many things that can be done with this tech, the world is going to be very problematic all because we(as a society) do not have the maturity to manage this tech. It's everyone for themselves and for profit. Another major problem with this tech and all tech, is the reliance people come to expect on these things.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    So use A.I. or ML to determine how many people are going to lose there jobs by this tech. The number of jobs created will never be enough to compensate for the jobs lost.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    ML is a great tool. I support it fully. Intelligence is not fully understood yet. So how can we even start to define something called A.I.?? What is the difference between 1) a computer with sensors and can do stuff and 2) A.I.?? Most people do NOT know the difference. I build automated trading systems. I do NOT consider any of it to be A.I. at all.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    With DeepFake, is Facial Recognition and Voice Recognition as a Security Key Feature really a Security Vulnerability… How secure is Facial or Voice Recognition?
    Biometrics being our "security key", did the Muslim have it right to wear that shawl… Hijab – a Protection for women?

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Tree of the knowledge of good and evil – To Choose not Options.
    A matter of hearts…
    Now that I know, do I use it to ignore you, to help you or to disadvantage you or to help me.
    Or do I help us both: you and me?
    Power or Vulnerability?
    Riches or Poverty?
    All for One or Winner Takes All?
    Ignorance WAS Bliss…

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    The official halloween sale has begun! I’m giving out deals all weekend! Free shipping on all orders and references can be provided! Hit me up asap!

    https://www.instagram.com/slaters666

    https://www.twitter.com/siater666

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Hearing Voices and Suicide Ideation: Entirely Possible Julian Assange is
    Being Hit with “Offensive Information Warfare” Neuroweaponry
    https://everydayconcerned.net/2020/09/26/hearing-voices-and-suicide-ideation-entirely-possible-julian-assange-is-being-hit-with-offensive-information-warfare-neuroweaponry/
    I
    am also a Targeted Individual being tortured with a synthetic telepathy
    weapon in Kettering, Ohio my name is Marilynn Page! Help!

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Go Sam José Sharks.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    That young fellow with the pancreatic cancer solution is the star of this documentary 🙂

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    I like how people underestimate what we can do , like we didn't create phones and TV as well as computers

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    I love A.I., and the things that it actually already is used in now, and do look forward to seeing what the potentials will be in our future.
    Now for the "But".
    But I only worry that we as humans let it do things we use to do fully and independently, that literally we improved on doing over time. Like driving, flying, cooking. To where that if humans essentially let AIs fully take over and do to where we eventually reach a point where AI does all the time, and humans no longer even learn do themselves much less improve the skill doing. Look what happens with auto pilots in planes and a malfunction happened, the end result was those pilots didn't know how to power off the auto-pilot Plus the auto-pilot essentially fought against the pilots trying to correct the danger. The pilots also couldnt do the override fast enough either. Needless to say they weren't abled to right the situation, and all people on that flight perished. What happens if some malfunction happens, and people have in some way not learned some necessary information, learn and perfect the hypothetical malfunction, and all it msy have taken is knowing where an emergency brake, or regular break is located and depress that lever…..
    ….I dont know if what Im getting at makes sense, but ya….

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    What app is she using at 34:54 to recognise facial expression?

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    VIOLATION
    😡😡😡 COVID 19 AND 5G ALGOTHERM ARE IN VIOLATION OF THE ETHICS – I AM SCREAMING😡😡😡 BIT MAD AT YOU LOT RIGHT NOW….

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    My question is why is AI a white woman?

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Kai fu lee 5:20 people dont understand?

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Afternoon

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    My car: voice commands: AI, alright. Automatic gear box: AI, according to the maker. The rest are just pure repetitive robots that react & respond to variables & inputs.
    Autopilot in airplane: purely robot with complex calculation ability that confuses people to think it is AI. Intelligence here means getting smarter, not performing complex functions quickly. They behave predictably, which is good. It doesn't get any smarter or develop new ideas, which is what separates AI and robot. There are more AI application in your smartphone than in a passenger jet. The fare engine determining on when to increase or decrease the ticket price is AI though.
    Self-driving car: yes, it is AI, computer needs to second guess what every human idiot on the street is about to do, what are the consequences to the AI, and they failed quite unsafe amount of time. A sunlight reflecting on a puddle will easily confuse the LIDAR and camera, blinding the computer and render the AI taking dangerous action, for example, some self-driving car think a puddle reflecting sunlight is a massive lane separator mark.
    AI function doesn't have to be fancy. Asking your phone to guess a song title requires AI, telling Siri to find you a joke is AI. But controlling a crazy things like space shuttle or Mars exploring robot is not AI.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Watch the TED talk on AI and our future (link below), it blew my mind.

    https://youtu.be/c0FTz5ru2Xc?t=16

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    Think for yourselves it's why we have a brain ,to much reliance on technology to think for us is nothing more than slave mentality.

  • WIRED
    November 16, 2020

    not yet

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